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Milkman Delivers Healthy Options to Fairfield

Ed Hartz thinks the “the future of food” lies firmly rooted in the American past. Hartz is the founder of The Milkman Company, whose aim is to take families in Fairfield and surrounding towns back to an age before industrialized farming—when a man in a white truck dropped off milk from the farm at your doorstep.

“Why the Milkman?” the Fairfield businessman says. “It’s something that represents basic goodness. It’s face-to-face.” Hartz takes orders from local homes for tons of food products. He sells milk and dairy, of course, but also fruits and vegetables, meat and poultry, even coffee and tea, delivering them to his customers’ doors.

But what separates Hartz from say, Stop and Shop’s PeaPod, is where he gets his supplies. Hartz has personally visited farms all over the Northeast to make sure the products he sells are organic and naturally grown.

That part of the business is key for Hartz. Since before he started the Milkman Company four months ago, he’s been reading about how most of America’s food is currently produced. He was disgusted with what he found—companies altering the DNA of crops to make them pest-resistant and injecting animals with hormones to produce more meat or milk. Hartz points to the rise of cancer and food allergies in the wake of these developments.

“If someone has to put the dollar before someone else’s health, there’s something wrong here,” he says. “It’s plain and simple.”

But Hartz says he doesn’t want to become “a political voice for all this.” Instead, he just hopes people will do what he’s started to do with his own kids. He takes them on his trips to farms so they can “become interested in agriculture again.”

The kids also come along on farm excursions so he can spend more time with them. Hartz has been working as many as 15 hours a day getting the Milkman Company started, far more than he was in his prior careers on Wall Street and in the stone restoration business. But that’s because he thinks Fairfield County is ready to buy what he’s selling.

“We are almost at the end of real food,” Hartz says, “unless we’re willing to fight to take back what we need [and] what we want.”

Do you try to keep your food organic? Where do you go to get it? Share your advice in the comments below.

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