Fairfield's Hwang, Kupchick Applaud School Epipen Bill

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Fairfield State Reps. Tony Hwang (R-134) and Brenda Kupchick (R-132) are supporting a bill that would allow school employees to have epinephrine pens for emergency first aid.
Fairfield State Reps. Tony Hwang (R-134) and Brenda Kupchick (R-132) are supporting a bill that would allow school employees to have epinephrine pens for emergency first aid. Photo Credit: Contributed

FAIRFIELD, Conn. -- Fairfield state Reps. Tony Hwang (R-134) and Brenda Kupchick (R-132) applauded a bill that would allow school employees to have epinephrine pens for emergency first aid. 

HB-5521 would allow "a qualified school employee to maintain epinephrine in cartridge injectors for emergency first aid to students who experience allergic reactions and is aimed at protecting children who may not know they're at risk," according to a press release. EpiPens at school are labeled as patient-specific, and nurses can not administer epinephrine without authorization, according to the release.

"Under the new proposal, schools could stock undesignated epinephrine for anyone who needs it, and give it to someone experiencing a first severe reaction at school," representatives said in the release. 

“It is our critical role as legislators and in a continual effort to ensure the safety of our children while they are in school, therefore, I support this bill," said Hwang. "This bill will eliminate bureaucratic process and delay of needed allergic reaction care for our kids in schools. It also balances the need for proper medical training and healthcare delivery protocols against the proliferation of epinephrine injector availability in our schools. The ultimate tipping point for me to support this bill is the goal to protect and ensure the health and safety of children.”

Kupchick agreed.

“More and more children are being diagnosed with food allergies. Peanuts, eggs, milk, soy, and wheat are the most common culprits. Unlike food intolerances, allergies are triggered by the immune system," Kupchick said. "A severe anaphylactic reaction can constrict air pathways leading to suffocation. The bill puts all our schools on a uniform policy that protects our students with life threatening allergies."

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